Appendix 1. Glossary of terms

  • Bottom time – the total time elapsed from when a diver leaves the surface to when the final ascent is commenced. Bottom time is always measured in minutes and always rounded up to the next whole minute.

 

  • Buddy system – a system in SCUBA diving operations in which a team of two or three free-swimming divers stay in contact during the dive (through hand signals or other means) in order to help each other. This also involves checking each other's equipment immediately prior to the dive. NOTE: Generally, one member of the team is nominated, and agreed to as the leader of the actions of the team.

 

  • Competent person – a person who has acquired, through training, qualifications or experience (or a combination of these), the knowledge and skills enabling that person to safely perform a specified task.

 

  • Compression (recompression) chamber (RCC) – a surface hyperbaric chamber in which a person can be subjected to pressure equivalent to or greater than those experienced when under water, or under conditions which simulate those experienced on an actual dive.

 

  • Decompression illness (DCI) – a generic term for acute illness resulting when pathological consequences arise from decompression. This term covers the condition known as decompression sickness and arterial gas embolism (AGE), but does not include barotraumas of ascent.

 

  • Decompression stop - the specific length of time that a diver must hold their ascent at a specified depth to allow for the elimination of sufficient inert gas from the body to allow a safe ascent to the next decompression stop or the surface.

 

  • Dive coordinating position – a single, designated location on the surface from which the diver's safety is monitored. This position can be next to the where the divers enter the water, or located somewhere else depending on local conditions.

 

  • Dive Coordinator – a person on site who supervises and coordinates any dive and is responsible for the dive team safety. A dive coordinator is the WHS representative and responsible person on site for a given dive trip.

 

  • Dive Leader – a person in charge of a specific part of a diving operation.

 

  • Dive plan – a procedure specific to a given diving operation. A dive plan should include maximum depth, maximum bottom time, enter and exit locations, details of the task to be performed underwater, positions in the dive team, emergency procedures and all other relevant information

 

  • Diver – a person who performs diving work underwater and who, for the purposes of this Diving Operations Manual, is trained and experienced in accordance with one of the categories mentioned within.

 

  • Dive Officer – a person who has been nominated in writing by the employer and is ultimately responsible for all diving operations and for appointing Dive Coordinators.

 

  • Diving team – divers and support personnel operating together.

 

  • Diving work – work in which diving is conducted using underwater breathing apparatus, including surface work by the dive team in direct support of the diver.

 

  • Effective Bottom Time (EBT) – for a diver carrying out repetitive diving, the bottom time calculated after taking into consideration the residual nitrogen from previous dives.

 

  • Effective depth – for a dive at altitude, the depth of an equivalent dive at sea level.

 

  • Exceptional exposure dive – a dive where the maximum recommended dive time for a particular depth (shown by the limiting line in decompression tables) is exceeded by a diver at that depth.

 

  • Float line – a buoyant line connecting the diver to a highly visible float on the surface of the water enabling the approximate location of the diver to be known at all times.

 

  • Lazy shot – a rope running from the surface to an attached weight, hanging free and positioned off the bottom or worksite.

 

  • Lifeline – a line attached to a diver that is capable of being used to haul the diver to the surface (ie weight bearing, and safely attached to the diver's body, and not the diver's equipment).

 

  • Occupational diving – diving performed in the course of employment (irrespective of whether or not diving is the main purpose of employment) and comprising all diving carried out –
  • as part of a business;
  • as a service;
  • for research;
  • for profit.

All diving approved by, and conducted under the authority of Macquarie University is considered occupational diving, including diving performed by unpaid volunteers from outside the organisation.

 

  • Quick release mechanism – a readily operated mechanism that enables the immediate release of diver's equipment, from the secured position by a single operation of one hand, but which is designed to minimize the risk of accidental release.

 

  • Repetitive dive – any dive conducted within 18 h of a previous dive or that has a repetitive factor greater than 1.0 when calculated using DCIEM tables.

 

  • Repetitive factor – for DCIEM tables, a figure determined by the repetitive dive group and the length of the surface interval after a dive and used for repetitive diving.

 

  • Reserve air supply – that quantity of air that will enable a diver to return safely to the surface from the planned depth of the dive, completing any planned decompression stops.

 

  • Residual nitrogen – nitrogen that is still dissolved in a diver's body tissues after the diver has surfaced.

 

  • Scientific diving – diving performed for the purpose of professional scientific research, natural resource management or scientific research as an educational activity.

 

  • Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) – open-circuit diving equipment which supplies the wearer with breathing gas from cylinders carried by the wearer.

 

  • Shot rope – a rope running from the surface and fixed to the worksite or bottom with a weight or attachment.

 

  • Surface Interval (SI) – the time which a diver has spent on the surface following a dive, beginning as soon as the diver surfaces and ending upon commencement of the diver's next descent.

 

  • Surface-supplied breathing apparatus (SSBA) – diving equipment that supplies breathing gas at the required pressure for the depth, through a diver's umbilical to a diver from plant at the surface. The diver only carries emergency breathing gas, also called "bailout cylinder".

 

  • Tethered mode (in relation to SCUBA diving) – SCUBA diving in which a diver is secured by a lifeline and tended by a diver's attendant, or is secured to a tended float line.

 

  • Visiting scientific diver – a trained, certified visiting diver from another country who performs tasks relevant to scientific diving in his or her own country, who has a current diving medical certification and who is allowed to dive under this Standard during his or her visit.

 

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